Stasi 2.0 – August 31st, 2014

Hillary Clinton talks NSA and privacy, data security, tech jobs in San Francisco | zdnet

Privacy and security are in a necessary but inevitable tension, reflected former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton while speaking at data storage and software provider Nexenta’s OpenSDx Summit on Thursday.

Proposing this debate has been going on in the United States since the days of the Founding Fathers (with Clinton trading out “privacy” for “liberty”), Clinton observed how concerns over privacy reached a fever pitch following the revelations about the National Security Agency last year. [Read more]

Big Brother: Meet the Parents | Politico

You’ve heard of Big Oil and Big Tobacco. Now get ready for Big Parent.

Moms and dads from across the political spectrum have mobilized into an unexpected political force in recent months to fight the data mining of their children. In a frenzy of activity, they’ve catapulted student privacy — an issue that was barely on anyone’s radar last spring — to prominence in statehouses from New York to Florida to Wyoming.

A months-long review by POLITICO of student privacy issues, including dozens of interviews, found the parent privacy lobby gaining momentum — and catching big-data advocates off guard. Initially dismissed as a fringe campaign, the privacy movement has attracted powerful allies on both the left and right. The American Civil Liberties Union is pushing for more student privacy protection. So is the American Legislative Exchange Council, the organization of conservative legislators. [Read more]

Should Businesses Be Concerned about NSA Snooping? | American Thinker

The controversies surrounding government surveillance aren’t just a problem for U.S. citizens and the tech companies accused of participating in data collection efforts. In short, yes, business leaders in the U.S. should have very real concerns surrounding NSA snooping because these programs damage public trust and create international distrust that can cause major business deals to fall through. One of the most notorious examples occurred in late 2013, when Brazil passed on Boeing’s defense contract bid, selecting the Swedish company Saab instead for the $4.5 billion contract. This enormous loss has been attributed to the NSA spying tensions. These events can take a toll on consumers and companies at the social and political levels, which is why it’s important for business leaders to have a keen eye on the latest NSA news. [Read more]

The executive order that led to mass spying, as told by NSA alumni | ars technica

One thing sits at the heart of what many consider a surveillance state within the US today.

The problem does not begin with political systems that discourage transparency or technologies that can intercept everyday communications without notice. Like everything else in Washington, there’s a legal basis for what many believe is extreme government overreach—in this case, it’s Executive Order 12333, issued in 1981.

“12333 is used to target foreigners abroad, and collection happens outside the US,” whistleblower John Tye, a former State Department official, told Ars recently. “My complaint is not that they’re using it to target Americans, my complaint is that the volume of incidental collection on US persons is unconstitutional.” [Read more]

 

Related Article

http://wp.me/p4sUqu-zW – Michael’s Blog

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Stasi 2.0 – August 31st, 2014

Hillary Clinton talks NSA and privacy, data security, tech jobs in San Francisco | zdnet

Privacy and security are in a necessary but inevitable tension, reflected former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton while speaking at data storage and software provider Nexenta’s OpenSDx Summit on Thursday.

Proposing this debate has been going on in the United States since the days of the Founding Fathers (with Clinton trading out “privacy” for “liberty”), Clinton observed how concerns over privacy reached a fever pitch following the revelations about the National Security Agency last year. [Read more]

Big Brother: Meet the Parents | Politico

You’ve heard of Big Oil and Big Tobacco. Now get ready for Big Parent.

Moms and dads from across the political spectrum have mobilized into an unexpected political force in recent months to fight the data mining of their children. In a frenzy of activity, they’ve catapulted student privacy — an issue that was barely on anyone’s radar last spring — to prominence in statehouses from New York to Florida to Wyoming.

A months-long review by POLITICO of student privacy issues, including dozens of interviews, found the parent privacy lobby gaining momentum — and catching big-data advocates off guard. Initially dismissed as a fringe campaign, the privacy movement has attracted powerful allies on both the left and right. The American Civil Liberties Union is pushing for more student privacy protection. So is the American Legislative Exchange Council, the organization of conservative legislators. [Read more]

Should Businesses Be Concerned about NSA Snooping? | American Thinker

The controversies surrounding government surveillance aren’t just a problem for U.S. citizens and the tech companies accused of participating in data collection efforts. In short, yes, business leaders in the U.S. should have very real concerns surrounding NSA snooping because these programs damage public trust and create international distrust that can cause major business deals to fall through. One of the most notorious examples occurred in late 2013, when Brazil passed on Boeing’s defense contract bid, selecting the Swedish company Saab instead for the $4.5 billion contract. This enormous loss has been attributed to the NSA spying tensions. These events can take a toll on consumers and companies at the social and political levels, which is why it’s important for business leaders to have a keen eye on the latest NSA news. [Read more]

The executive order that led to mass spying, as told by NSA alumni | ars technica

One thing sits at the heart of what many consider a surveillance state within the US today.

The problem does not begin with political systems that discourage transparency or technologies that can intercept everyday communications without notice. Like everything else in Washington, there’s a legal basis for what many believe is extreme government overreach—in this case, it’s Executive Order 12333, issued in 1981.

“12333 is used to target foreigners abroad, and collection happens outside the US,” whistleblower John Tye, a former State Department official, told Ars recently. “My complaint is not that they’re using it to target Americans, my complaint is that the volume of incidental collection on US persons is unconstitutional.” [Read more]

 

Related Article

http://wp.me/p4sUqu-zW – Michael’s Blog

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